Iceland

Iceland

Conscription: No (since always).

Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict: Signed (7 Sep 2000). Ratified (1 Oct 2001).
Military expenditure: 0.1% of GDP (data 2009).

Remarks:
1) In June 2006 the Committee on the Rights of the Child expressed its concern that the absence of armed forces in the country itself did not preclude “the possibility of individuals or groups undertaking efforts to recruit children for foreign armed forces or groups”.

Recommendations:
1) Explicitly criminalize the recruitment of children under the age of 15 into armed forces or armed groups and their direct participation in hostilities. Establish extraterritorial jurisdiction for these crimes when perpetrated by or against an Icelandic citizen or an individual connected in some way with Iceland.
Notes: No regular military forces. Iceland has no standing military force; under a 1951 bilateral agreement - still valid - its defense was provided by the US-manned Icelandic Defense Force (IDF) headquartered at Keflavik; however, all US military forces in Iceland were withdrawn as of October 2006; although wartime defense of Iceland remains a NATO commitment, in April 2007, Iceland and Norway signed a bilateral agreement providing for Norwegian aerial surveillance and defense of Icelandic airspace.